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Medal of Honor - tarinoita

Viestiketju osiossa 'Menneet sodat ja sotahistoria' , aloittaja Leaderwolf, 22.11.2016.

  1. Leaderwolf

    Leaderwolf Luutnantti Lahjoittaja

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    En löytänyt sopivaa ketjua johon pistää linkkiä tähän taisteluun, jonka aikana osoitettiin todellista sankaruutta, rohkeutta ja tietoista uhrausta muiden pelastamiseksi ylivoimaisen vihollisen edessä. Tässä siis ensimmäinen tarinamme.

    Kyseessä on Battle of Samar 1944.

    Japanilaisten Center forcen taistelulaivat ja raskaat risteilijät yllättivät Yhdysvaltojen Taffy kolmosen, kolme lentotukialusta ja muutamia hävittäjiä ja hävittäjäsaattajia. USAn komentajat kielsivät lähistöllä olevia omia joukkoja (Taffy 2) auttamasta Taffy kolmosta pelätessään muiden joukkojen menetystä, tuomiten Taffy kolmosen varmaan kuolemaan. Siitä johtuen lentotukialuksia saattaneiden hävittäjien kapteenit päättivät käydä epätoivoiseen hyökkäykseen japanilaisten taistelulaivoja (mm.Yamato) ja risteilijöitä vastaan ostakseen uhrauksellaan lentotukialuksille aikaa paeta.

    Tässä vain muutama ote taistelusta, kannattaa lukea ehdottomasti koko teksti taistelusta Linkin takaa. Yksi historian koskettavimmista taisteluista mielestäni.

    :salut::salut::salut:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_off_Samar
     
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  3. Sardaukar

    Sardaukar Ylipäällikkö Lahjoittaja

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    Klassinen lausahdus yhden Taffy 3:n CVE:n tuntemattomaksi jääneeltä 40mm Bofors-tykin aliupseerilta:

    "We are sucking them into 40 mm range!"

    :D
     
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  4. Talvela

    Talvela Ylipäällikkö

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    Aion heti rikkoa sääntöä ja laittaa Victoria Cross tarinan. :D


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    http://ww2today.com/14th-february-1942-the-last-gallant-battle-of-hms-li-wo
     
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  5. Talvela

    Talvela Ylipäällikkö

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    Tästä olisi pitänyt tulla Medal of Honor.




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  6. STI_Tactical9mm

    STI_Tactical9mm Eversti Lahjoittaja

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    Tässä on oikea BAMF:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Benavidez

    Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. BENAVIDEZ United States Army, distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam.

    On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters of the 240th Assault Helicopter Company in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire.

    Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters, of the 240th Assault Helicopter Company, returned to off-load wounded crew members and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant BENAVIDEZ voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team.

    Prior to reaching the team's position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team's position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy's fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader.

    When he reached the leader's body, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy's fire and so permit another extraction attempt.

    He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from behind by an enemy soldier. In the ensuing hand-to-hand combat, he sustained additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary.[5][note 1] He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded.

    Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant BENAVIDEZ' gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.
     
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  7. John Hilly

    John Hilly Eversti

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    Mielenkiintoinen tarina Tyynenmeren taisteluista:

    Jan. 30, 1944: Riding a Tank to Victory at Bougainville
    By From Army.mil, Compiled for NCO Journal by Pablo Villa


    PRINT | E-MAIL | CONTACT AUTHOR
    WASHINGTON, Feb. 7, 2017 — When Army Staff Sgt. Jesse Ray Drowley arrived alone at an American camp on the Solomon Islands with a gaping wound in his chest, a missing eye and a shredded uniform, a junior officer threatened to court-martial him for abandoning his defense post. Instead, Drowley was put on the path to history.


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    On Jan. 30, 1944, Drowley was a rifle squad leader with B Company, 132nd Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, when he displayed the bravery that would earn him the Medal of Honor.

    The Americal Division arrived on Bougainville on Dec. 25, 1943, as part of the Solomon Islands and New Guinea campaigns. The division was unique in World War II as it carried a name and not a numerical designation. It got its name from "American, New Caledonia," the South Pacific island on which the unit was provisionally formed for defense in May 1942. Though officially known later as the 23rd Infantry Division, the Americal name remained.

    A month after the unit's arrival, Drowley was assigned a defensive role with his company as a neighboring company launched an attack against Japanese defensive positions. The staff sergeant witnessed three wounded soldiers from the neighboring unit collapse. Intense enemy fire prevented their rescue. That's when Drowley made a fateful decision.

    Fearless Rescue

    According to his Medal of Honor citation, Drowley "fearlessly rushed forward to carry the wounded" one-by-one to cover. After moving two of the men to safety amid a hail of gunfire, Drowley discovered an enemy pillbox that American assault tanks had missed. The enemy fighters within were "inflicting heavy casualties upon the attacking force and … a chief obstacle to the success of the advance."

    The dire situation didn't deter him. Drowley directed another soldier to complete the rescue of the third wounded soldier. Meanwhile, he darted out across open terrain to one of the American tanks. Drowley climbed the turret and signaled the crew. He exchanged his weapon for a submachine gun and rode the deck of the tank while firing toward the pillbox with tracer fire. As the tank ambled closer to the enemy position, Drowley received a severe wound to the chest. He refused to leave his position for medical treatment, instead continuing to direct the tank's driver to the pillbox. He was shot again -- losing his left eye -- and knocked to the ground.

    But Drowley remained undaunted. Despite his injuries, he continued to walk alongside the tank until it was able to open fire on the enemy pillbox and destroy it. In the process, American forces discovered another pillbox behind the first and destroyed it as well. With his mission finally completed, Drowley returned to camp for medical treatment. When he reached the safety of the American outpost, his platoon leader admonished him for leaving his post. But the reason he left was quickly learned, and he was eventually recommended for the nation's highest military honor.

    Drowley was awarded the Medal of Honor on Sept. 6, 1944. After receiving the accolade, he was offered a commission and a chance to speak at war rallies, but Drowley declined and eventually left the service. He lived a quiet life for the rest of his years. In 1991, he told The Spokesman Review of Spokane, Washington, that he shied away from the title of hero.

    'What Did You Do?'

    "People say, 'What did you do to get the Medal of Honor?' You were only doing your job," Drowley said. "You're fearless, all right. You're so damned scared you're past fearless. But you're going to get killed if you don't do anything."

    Along with the Medal of Honor, Drowley was also awarded the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Clusters and two Bronze Stars. He was the first Americal soldier to be awarded the medal and the division's lone recipient for action in World War II. While recovering from his wounds at a hospital in Spokane, he met his future wife, Kathleen McAvoy. He returned to Washington after the war from his native St. Charles, Michigan. He operated a service station before working as a civilian employee at Fairchild Air Force Base. He retired in 1980.

    Drowley died May 20, 1996. He was 76. He was buried at Fairmount Memorial Park in Spokane.

    https://www.defense.gov/News/Articl...to-victory-at-bougainville?source=GovDelivery
     
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  8. Sardaukar

    Sardaukar Ylipäällikkö Lahjoittaja

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    Ei kai tämä ketju ole mitään ilman tätä heppua:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Basilone

    John Basilone (November 4, 1916 – February 19, 1945) was a United States Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who was killed in action during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor for heroism above and beyond the call of duty during the Battle of Guadalcanal and the Navy Cross posthumously for extraordinary heroism during the Battle of Iwo Jima. He was the only enlisted Marine to receive both of these decorations in World War II.

    Kuriositeettina voi mainita, että Basilonen leski ei koskaan mennyt uusiin naimisiin. Kysyttäessä totesi, että "when you have had best, you'll never want second best".
     
  9. John Hilly

    John Hilly Eversti

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    Navy Capt. Thomas Kelley, Medal of Honor recipient.

    Kelley gave a 40-minute talk followed by a question and answer session. His talk was not just on the event in 1969 which led to his being awarded the Medal of Honor, but also on what motivated him to join the Navy and some of the assignments and experiences he had over his 30-year career.

    "One of the biggest takeaways I want you to remember," he told the audience which included many young Sailors from CORIVRON 8, "is don't be threatened by your senior enlisted or those who know more than you do. Take advantage of them and learn from them."

    "I had an older cousin who was a Marine on Iwo Jima; he was always a hero of mine growing up," Kelley continued. "One of my warrants (chief warrant officers), Leroy Hagan, had been on a diesel submarine in World War II. He was the calmest, most generous mentor I ever had, but thinking about what he went through was really sobering. I saw the power of the Chiefs Mess early on in my career."

    Kelley was on the base at the invitation of the Navy Exchange to promote a new edition of the bestselling book "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty." Kelley is no stranger to Navy Newport and actually attended Officer Candidate School here following his graduation from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1960. He served on several ships homeported in Newport including landing craft repair ship USS Pandemus (ARL-18), and destroyers USS Davis (DD-937) and USS Stickell (DD-888). It was aboard Stickell he experienced his first deployment in Vietnam in 1966. He returned from that deployment and volunteered for the riverine squadron.

    "We had training at Mare Island shipyard and deployed using converted LCM 6s -- old World War II boats that went 6 knots with a current -- and you could hear them coming from 2 clicks (kilometers) away," he said. "They reinforced them with rebar and Styrofoam, which actually worked pretty good."

    Kelley was gravely wounded in Vietnam, including losing an eye.

    "After I was wounded the Navy wanted to get me out; I told them I wouldn't get out," he added. "They told me I could stay in as a restricted line officer, but I wanted to be an unrestricted line officer. It's every surface warfare officer's dream to command a ship, so I went whining to Admiral [Elmo] Zumwalt, who was CNO (chief of naval operations) at the time and knew me from Vietnam, and told him they are trying to kick me out and he said, 'Don't worry about that.' I stayed in for another 20 years."

    A true example of honor, courage, and commitment.

    Medal of Honor Citation
    Date of Incident: June 15, 1969, Vietnam
    Date of Aware: May 14, 1970

    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in the afternoon while serving as commander of River Assault Division 152 during combat operations against enemy aggressor forces. Lt. Cmdr. (then Lt.) Kelley was in charge of a column of 8 river assault craft which were extracting 1 company of U.S. Army infantry troops on the east bank of the Ong Muong Canal in Kien Hoa province, when 1 of the armored troop carriers reported a mechanical failure of a loading ramp. At approximately the same time, Viet Cong forces opened fire from the opposite bank of the canal. After issuing orders for the crippled troop carrier to raise its ramp manually, and for the remaining boats to form a protective cordon around the disabled craft, Lt. Cmdr. Kelley realizing the extreme danger to his column and its inability to clear the ambush site until the crippled unit was repaired, boldly maneuvered the monitor in which he was embarked to the exposed side of the protective cordon in direct line with the enemy's fire, and ordered the monitor to commence firing. Suddenly, an enemy rocket scored a direct hit on the coxswain's flat, the shell penetrating the thick armor plate, and the explosion spraying shrapnel in all directions. Sustaining serious head wounds from the blast, which hurled him to the deck of the monitor, Lt. Cmdr. Kelley disregarded his severe injuries and attempted to continue directing the other boats. Although unable to move from the deck or to speak clearly into the radio, he succeeded in relaying his commands through 1 of his men until the enemy attack was silenced and the boats were able to move to an area of safety. Lt. Cmdr. Kelley's brilliant leadership, bold initiative, and resolute determination served to inspire his men and provide the impetus needed to carry out the mission after he was medically evacuated by helicopter. His extraordinary courage under fire, and his selfless devotion to duty sustain and enhance the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

    http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=98936
     
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