Medal of Honor - tarinoita

Leaderwolf

Kenraali
Lahjoittaja
#1
En löytänyt sopivaa ketjua johon pistää linkkiä tähän taisteluun, jonka aikana osoitettiin todellista sankaruutta, rohkeutta ja tietoista uhrausta muiden pelastamiseksi ylivoimaisen vihollisen edessä. Tässä siis ensimmäinen tarinamme.

Kyseessä on Battle of Samar 1944.

Japanilaisten Center forcen taistelulaivat ja raskaat risteilijät yllättivät Yhdysvaltojen Taffy kolmosen, kolme lentotukialusta ja muutamia hävittäjiä ja hävittäjäsaattajia. USAn komentajat kielsivät lähistöllä olevia omia joukkoja (Taffy 2) auttamasta Taffy kolmosta pelätessään muiden joukkojen menetystä, tuomiten Taffy kolmosen varmaan kuolemaan. Siitä johtuen lentotukialuksia saattaneiden hävittäjien kapteenit päättivät käydä epätoivoiseen hyökkäykseen japanilaisten taistelulaivoja (mm.Yamato) ja risteilijöitä vastaan ostakseen uhrauksellaan lentotukialuksille aikaa paeta.

Tässä vain muutama ote taistelusta, kannattaa lukea ehdottomasti koko teksti taistelusta Linkin takaa. Yksi historian koskettavimmista taisteluista mielestäni.

In no engagement of its entire history has the United States Navy shown more gallantry, guts and gumption than in those two morning hours between 0730 and 0930 off Samar
Gunner's mate Paul H. Carr was in charge of the aft 5 in gun mount, which had fired nearly all of its 325 stored rounds in 35 minutes before a breech explosion caused by the gun's barrel overheating. Carr was found dying at his station, begging for help loading the last round he was holding into the breech. He was awarded a Silver Star, and a guided missile frigate was later named for him
The crippled Johnston was an easy target. Fighting with all she had, she exchanged fire with four cruisers and numerous destroyers. As her attackers gathered around the vulnerable ship, they concentrated fire on her rather than the fleeing carriers. Johnston was hit so many times that one survivor recalled "they couldn't patch holes fast enough to keep her afloat."

Japanese themselves first recognized Johnston's incredible actions that day: As a destroyer from the opposing fleet cruised slowly by, Robert Billie and several other crewmen watched as the Japanese captain saluted the sinking Johnston, having considered her an honorable opponent.
For extraordinary heroism in action against powerful units of the Japanese Fleet during the Battle off Samar, Philippines, October 25, 1944. ...the gallant ships of the Task Unit waged battle fiercely against the superior speed and fire power of the advancing enemy ...two of the Unit's valiant destroyers and one destroyer escort charged the battleships point-blank and, expending their last torpedoes in desperate defense of the entire group, went down under the enemy's heavy shells
:salut::salut::salut:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_off_Samar
 

Sardaukar

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
#2
Klassinen lausahdus yhden Taffy 3:n CVE:n tuntemattomaksi jääneeltä 40mm Bofors-tykin aliupseerilta:

"We are sucking them into 40 mm range!"

:D
 

Talvela

Ylipäällikkö
#3
Aion heti rikkoa sääntöä ja laittaa Victoria Cross tarinan. :D





On 14th February 1942, H.M.S. Li Wo, a patrol vessel of 1,000 tons, formerly a passenger steamer on the Upper Yangtse River, was on passage from Singapore to Batavia. Her ship’s company consisted of eighty-four officers and men, including one civilian; they were mainly survivors from His Majesty’s Ships which had been sunk, and a few from units of the Army and Royal Air Force. Her armament was one 4-inch gun, for which she had only thirteen practise shells, and two machine guns.

Since leaving Singapore the previous day, the ship had beaten off four air attacks, in one of which fifty-two machines took part, and had suffered considerable damage. Late in the afternoon, she sighted two enemy convoys, the larger of which was escorted by Japanese naval units, including a heavy cruiser and some destroyers. The Commanding Officer, Lieutenant T. Wilkinson, R.N.R., gathered his scratch ship’s company together and told them that, rather than try to escape, he had decided to fight to the last, in the hope that he might inflict damage upon the enemy. In making this decision, which drew resolute support from the whole ship’s company, Lieutenant Wilkinson knew that his ship faced certain destruction, and that his own chances of survival were small.

H.M.S. Li Wo hoisted her battle ensign and made straight for the enemy.
In the action which followed, the machine guns were used with effect upon the crews of all ships in range, and a volunteer gun’s crew manned the 4-inch gun, which they fought with such purpose that a Japanese transport was badly hit and set on fire.

After a little over an hour, H.M.S. Li Wo had been critically damaged and was sinking. Lieutenant Wilkinson then decided to ram his principal target, the large transport, which had been abandoned by her crew. It is known that this ship burnt fiercely throughout the night following the action, and was probably sunk.

H.M.S. Li Wo’s gallant fight ended when, her shells spent, and under heavy fire from the enemy cruiser, Lieutenant Wilkinson finally ordered abandon ship. He himself remained on board, and went down with her. There were only about ten survivors, who were later made prisoners of war.

Lieutenant Wilkinson’s valour was equalled only by the skill with which he fought his ship. The Victoria Cross is bestowed upon him posthumously in recognition both of his own heroism and self-sacrifice, and of all who fought and died with him.

The engagement lasted for nearly an hour, until finally, and seemingly reluctantly, the gallant little ‘Li Wo’ sank beneath the combined fire power of the cruiser and the destroyer – but her battle ensign still flying from the masthead and her captain, Temporary Lieutenant Thomas Wilkinson. RNR, was still standing on her bridge and the transport she had attacked was abandoned on fire and sinking fast.

Jap machine gunners opened fire on the swimmers, on rafts and on lifeboats. They threw grenades at them and even lumps of coal and finally the destroyer cleaved its way through the wreckage at speed in an attempt to mow them down as they struggled in the water. Only eight survived to clamber on to a swamped life boat, and out of these two succumbed to their wounds.

Later, three of the others got over to another piece of wreckage that appeared to be more durable, leaving Charlie Rogers with one Leading Seaman and one Malay to drift on. The next day they had the good fortune to drift along side a naval whaler, which, though badly damaged, and swamped, had oars in it along with a sail. They got the sail up and started to move.

During the night they heard faint cries and found two rafts with seven more survivors from their ship. All they could do for these lads was to tow the rafts, for the whaler was near sinking as it was, but by the next day they reached Banka Island.

Here they all crawled on to the beach to lie exhausted, and it was in this state that the Jap invasion force found them and made them prisoners. That was the start of another saga.
http://ww2today.com/14th-february-1942-the-last-gallant-battle-of-hms-li-wo
 

Talvela

Ylipäällikkö
#4
Tästä olisi pitänyt tulla Medal of Honor.






The Epic Battle of the Edsall vs. IJN's "First Air Fleet"

On March 1, 1942 the USS Edsall had initially left the USS Pecos to head for Tjilatjap, Java to deliver the 32 US Army Air Corps pilots to their remaining planes. However, an hour after leaving Pecos and Whipple ABDACOM sent a message that the Japanese had landed on Java and all ships were to escape to Australia. Dutifully, and I'm sure with some relief for the airmen, Captain Nix headed to Australia.

Then at noon the Edsall picked up a distress call from the Pecos. She turned around and went back towards Christmas Island. However, unlike USS Whipple, she couldn't run as fast, the depth charge damage still limited her top speed to 26 knots. Little did her captain know that the lack of repairs had certainly doomed the ship.

Back on February 25, 1942, First Air Fleet (Kido Butai) commander Vice Admiral Chūichi Nagumo was given the mission to enter the Indian Ocean and “to cut off any escape of the Allied Forces.” The First Air Fleet was split with half of his carriers detached supporting the invasion of the Dutch East Indies from the north along with the fast Battleship Division 3/1, the Kongo and Haruna, and some cruisers and destroyers. Personally Nagumo led the rest south consisting of the aircraft carriers Sōryū and Akagi escorted by the fast battleships of Battleship Division 3/2, the Hiei and Kirishima, plus Cruiser Division 8 consisting of Tone and Chikuma, Destroyer Squadron 1 and six fleet oilers. The sea is full of merchant shipping fleeing the Dutch East Indies and Philippines for the presumed safety of Darwin, Australia not knowing the First Air Fleet has already rendered the port inoperable. The Japanese aircrews are having a field day.

On March 1, 1942 the First Air Fleet reconnaissance planes from CruDiv 8 have so far found the USS Pecos and the fleet is going to attack it by carrier planes. Then at 1130 hours another float plaine spots the Dutch merchantman Modjokerto. Chikuma, aided by the destroyers Kasumi and Shiranuhi, goes after Modjokerto. Chikuma sinks the merchantman by gunfire and then rescues survivors from the sea.

At noon the first wave from Sōryū reaches the Pecos. Both carriers are committed to sinking this fat prize when at 1550 hours one of the A6M2 Type 0 Model 11 "Zeke" fighters flying Combat Air Patrol (CAP) over the fleet spots what he identifies as a "Marblehead class" light cruiser trailing the fleet 30 km away. It is the Edsall, the pilot counted four funnels on the old Clemson class destroyer and thought it was a four stack Omaha class light cruiser.

At 1552 hours Vice Admiral Nagumo learns of the sighting and orders Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa's BatDiv 3/2 aided by CruDiv 8 to sink it. Admiral Mikawa must've thought it was a fox hunt as he ordered the Kongo class battleships Hiei, his flagship into the lead and Kirishima trailing into the chase while sending Tone and Chikuma to "hound' the prey from the starboard and port respectively.

At 1602 hours, barely twelve minutes from being sighted by the "Zero," the Tone first spots the Edsall and visa versa. One minute later Chikuma opens fire at extreme range, 21 km, with all the guns she can bring to bear but all of the 8" (203 mm) shells do nothing but kill fish. Captain Nix pours on the oil and lights off a smoke screen. The Edsall disappears from view but the Japanese ships have the speed to run the damaged destroyer down. It will only be a matter of time before they get her. Nix knows this but he plans on making them work hard for the kill.

At 1616 hours Hiei spots the Edsall and opens fire at a range of 27.9 km. Captain Nix sees the flash of the battlewagon's guns and immediately turns his ship. As the enemy fleet fires he changes directions, slows and speeds up again, and turns circles around their splashes. To aid in spotting the shifty destroyer Admiral Mikawa orders all spotting planes launched at 1619 hours. Then at 1620 hours he orders, "All ships charge!" At 1639 Mikawa orders all ships to flank speed. But even with the aid of the planes the battleships and cruisers can't hit their crafty foe.

For the next hour and a half Nix nimbly evades every salvo the Japanese can throw at him. He uses smoke and rain squalls to slip briefly out of view giving his crews a respite from the fire. At 1756 hours Nix gamely makes a run at the Chikuma firing torpedoes but they miss. Bravely Nix even orders the Edsall to close on his foes and opens fire with his 4" (102mm) guns but the shells simply fall short. Meanwhile the Japanese are firing with everything they've got.

At 1800 hours Chikuma has to quit firing due to a rain squall. It is around that time that reports start to come in from the main gun magazines that the cruiser is almost out of 8" ammunition. CruDiv 8 has fired 844 main gun shells and 62 secondary gun shells at Edsall for a total of 1 non-crippling hit by Tone and that only finally comes at 1835 hours.

The situation aboard the flagship is not much better. Out of 210 14" rounds and 70 6" rounds fired by Hiei at Edsall, only one 14" round hit at 1824 hours and it didn't seem to faze the destroyer. It likely over-penetrated causing minimal damage. Kirishima's gun reports were no better, in fact out of 87 14" and 62 6" the battleship had not made one single hit on their small foe. Edsall had dodged 1335 rounds of heavy caliber fire with only two hits. Admiral Mikawa admitted defeat, if they continued the fleet would be out of ammunition before they would sink the destroyer. The fox was winning.

Admiral Nagumo was furious when the request came for carrier aircraft to sink the Edsall. His aircrews and service personnel were tired from the repeated attacks against the Pecos which also had proven hard to sink despite having almost no effective AA guns. Against the backdrop of the setting sun he ordered two waves of air strikes against the Edsall. And he wasn't going to let the little gnat get away with dodging these bombs. Nagumo ordered the largest ship-killers he had in his arsenal to be loaded on the planes, 1,100 lb. (500 kg.) along with 550 lb. (250 kg.) HE bombs.

From 1827 hours to 1850 hours the planes attack the destroyer as Nix tries to evade. But near misses can be as bad as hits, especially with the big bombs. Eight of them either hit the ship or close enough to damage it. The pilots radio back success as a fire rages amidship and the destroyer looks to be out of control. In fact the engine room is flooding from her opened seams. In a final gesture of defiance Captain Nix turns the ship straight at his foes, offering the smallest target to them and looking that if he could he would resume his attacks on them. Then he begins evacuating the ship.

Chikuma wastes no time and closes on the dead ship to finish her with 5" secondary guns, likely the only ones with enough ammunition to spare. Aboard the Tone a crewman has gotten a movie camera out and records 90 seconds of Edsall's final moments including when the Chikuma must've hit her magazine as she leaps from the sea with the explosion. At 1900 hours the Edsall rolls over and "shows her red bottom" as one officer aboard the Tone notes. The gallant ship and her able captain, Lt. J.J. Nix, are gone for good. The US Navy never hears of the story of Edsall's loss and merely chalks her disappearance as a loss of war, her crew "missing in action - presumed dead." There are no headlines, no honors or medals awarded. The Japanese quietly among themselves term the encounter a "fiasco."
 

STI_Tactical9mm

Kenraali
Lahjoittaja
#5
Tässä on oikea BAMF:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Benavidez

Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. BENAVIDEZ United States Army, distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam.

On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters of the 240th Assault Helicopter Company in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire.

Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters, of the 240th Assault Helicopter Company, returned to off-load wounded crew members and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant BENAVIDEZ voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team.

Prior to reaching the team's position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team's position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy's fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader.

When he reached the leader's body, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant BENAVIDEZ mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy's fire and so permit another extraction attempt.

He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from behind by an enemy soldier. In the ensuing hand-to-hand combat, he sustained additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary.[5][note 1] He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded.

Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant BENAVIDEZ' gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.
 
#6
Mielenkiintoinen tarina Tyynenmeren taisteluista:

Jan. 30, 1944: Riding a Tank to Victory at Bougainville
By From Army.mil, Compiled for NCO Journal by Pablo Villa


PRINT | E-MAIL | CONTACT AUTHOR
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7, 2017 — When Army Staff Sgt. Jesse Ray Drowley arrived alone at an American camp on the Solomon Islands with a gaping wound in his chest, a missing eye and a shredded uniform, a junior officer threatened to court-martial him for abandoning his defense post. Instead, Drowley was put on the path to history.




On Jan. 30, 1944, Drowley was a rifle squad leader with B Company, 132nd Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, when he displayed the bravery that would earn him the Medal of Honor.

The Americal Division arrived on Bougainville on Dec. 25, 1943, as part of the Solomon Islands and New Guinea campaigns. The division was unique in World War II as it carried a name and not a numerical designation. It got its name from "American, New Caledonia," the South Pacific island on which the unit was provisionally formed for defense in May 1942. Though officially known later as the 23rd Infantry Division, the Americal name remained.

A month after the unit's arrival, Drowley was assigned a defensive role with his company as a neighboring company launched an attack against Japanese defensive positions. The staff sergeant witnessed three wounded soldiers from the neighboring unit collapse. Intense enemy fire prevented their rescue. That's when Drowley made a fateful decision.

Fearless Rescue

According to his Medal of Honor citation, Drowley "fearlessly rushed forward to carry the wounded" one-by-one to cover. After moving two of the men to safety amid a hail of gunfire, Drowley discovered an enemy pillbox that American assault tanks had missed. The enemy fighters within were "inflicting heavy casualties upon the attacking force and … a chief obstacle to the success of the advance."

The dire situation didn't deter him. Drowley directed another soldier to complete the rescue of the third wounded soldier. Meanwhile, he darted out across open terrain to one of the American tanks. Drowley climbed the turret and signaled the crew. He exchanged his weapon for a submachine gun and rode the deck of the tank while firing toward the pillbox with tracer fire. As the tank ambled closer to the enemy position, Drowley received a severe wound to the chest. He refused to leave his position for medical treatment, instead continuing to direct the tank's driver to the pillbox. He was shot again -- losing his left eye -- and knocked to the ground.

But Drowley remained undaunted. Despite his injuries, he continued to walk alongside the tank until it was able to open fire on the enemy pillbox and destroy it. In the process, American forces discovered another pillbox behind the first and destroyed it as well. With his mission finally completed, Drowley returned to camp for medical treatment. When he reached the safety of the American outpost, his platoon leader admonished him for leaving his post. But the reason he left was quickly learned, and he was eventually recommended for the nation's highest military honor.

Drowley was awarded the Medal of Honor on Sept. 6, 1944. After receiving the accolade, he was offered a commission and a chance to speak at war rallies, but Drowley declined and eventually left the service. He lived a quiet life for the rest of his years. In 1991, he told The Spokesman Review of Spokane, Washington, that he shied away from the title of hero.

'What Did You Do?'

"People say, 'What did you do to get the Medal of Honor?' You were only doing your job," Drowley said. "You're fearless, all right. You're so damned scared you're past fearless. But you're going to get killed if you don't do anything."

Along with the Medal of Honor, Drowley was also awarded the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Clusters and two Bronze Stars. He was the first Americal soldier to be awarded the medal and the division's lone recipient for action in World War II. While recovering from his wounds at a hospital in Spokane, he met his future wife, Kathleen McAvoy. He returned to Washington after the war from his native St. Charles, Michigan. He operated a service station before working as a civilian employee at Fairchild Air Force Base. He retired in 1980.

Drowley died May 20, 1996. He was 76. He was buried at Fairmount Memorial Park in Spokane.

https://www.defense.gov/News/Articl...to-victory-at-bougainville?source=GovDelivery
 

Sardaukar

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
#7
Ei kai tämä ketju ole mitään ilman tätä heppua:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Basilone

John Basilone (November 4, 1916 – February 19, 1945) was a United States Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who was killed in action during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor for heroism above and beyond the call of duty during the Battle of Guadalcanal and the Navy Cross posthumously for extraordinary heroism during the Battle of Iwo Jima. He was the only enlisted Marine to receive both of these decorations in World War II.

Kuriositeettina voi mainita, että Basilonen leski ei koskaan mennyt uusiin naimisiin. Kysyttäessä totesi, että "when you have had best, you'll never want second best".
 
#8
Navy Capt. Thomas Kelley, Medal of Honor recipient.

Kelley gave a 40-minute talk followed by a question and answer session. His talk was not just on the event in 1969 which led to his being awarded the Medal of Honor, but also on what motivated him to join the Navy and some of the assignments and experiences he had over his 30-year career.

"One of the biggest takeaways I want you to remember," he told the audience which included many young Sailors from CORIVRON 8, "is don't be threatened by your senior enlisted or those who know more than you do. Take advantage of them and learn from them."

"I had an older cousin who was a Marine on Iwo Jima; he was always a hero of mine growing up," Kelley continued. "One of my warrants (chief warrant officers), Leroy Hagan, had been on a diesel submarine in World War II. He was the calmest, most generous mentor I ever had, but thinking about what he went through was really sobering. I saw the power of the Chiefs Mess early on in my career."

Kelley was on the base at the invitation of the Navy Exchange to promote a new edition of the bestselling book "Medal of Honor: Portraits of Valor Beyond the Call of Duty." Kelley is no stranger to Navy Newport and actually attended Officer Candidate School here following his graduation from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1960. He served on several ships homeported in Newport including landing craft repair ship USS Pandemus (ARL-18), and destroyers USS Davis (DD-937) and USS Stickell (DD-888). It was aboard Stickell he experienced his first deployment in Vietnam in 1966. He returned from that deployment and volunteered for the riverine squadron.

"We had training at Mare Island shipyard and deployed using converted LCM 6s -- old World War II boats that went 6 knots with a current -- and you could hear them coming from 2 clicks (kilometers) away," he said. "They reinforced them with rebar and Styrofoam, which actually worked pretty good."

Kelley was gravely wounded in Vietnam, including losing an eye.

"After I was wounded the Navy wanted to get me out; I told them I wouldn't get out," he added. "They told me I could stay in as a restricted line officer, but I wanted to be an unrestricted line officer. It's every surface warfare officer's dream to command a ship, so I went whining to Admiral [Elmo] Zumwalt, who was CNO (chief of naval operations) at the time and knew me from Vietnam, and told him they are trying to kick me out and he said, 'Don't worry about that.' I stayed in for another 20 years."

A true example of honor, courage, and commitment.

Medal of Honor Citation
Date of Incident: June 15, 1969, Vietnam
Date of Aware: May 14, 1970

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in the afternoon while serving as commander of River Assault Division 152 during combat operations against enemy aggressor forces. Lt. Cmdr. (then Lt.) Kelley was in charge of a column of 8 river assault craft which were extracting 1 company of U.S. Army infantry troops on the east bank of the Ong Muong Canal in Kien Hoa province, when 1 of the armored troop carriers reported a mechanical failure of a loading ramp. At approximately the same time, Viet Cong forces opened fire from the opposite bank of the canal. After issuing orders for the crippled troop carrier to raise its ramp manually, and for the remaining boats to form a protective cordon around the disabled craft, Lt. Cmdr. Kelley realizing the extreme danger to his column and its inability to clear the ambush site until the crippled unit was repaired, boldly maneuvered the monitor in which he was embarked to the exposed side of the protective cordon in direct line with the enemy's fire, and ordered the monitor to commence firing. Suddenly, an enemy rocket scored a direct hit on the coxswain's flat, the shell penetrating the thick armor plate, and the explosion spraying shrapnel in all directions. Sustaining serious head wounds from the blast, which hurled him to the deck of the monitor, Lt. Cmdr. Kelley disregarded his severe injuries and attempted to continue directing the other boats. Although unable to move from the deck or to speak clearly into the radio, he succeeded in relaying his commands through 1 of his men until the enemy attack was silenced and the boats were able to move to an area of safety. Lt. Cmdr. Kelley's brilliant leadership, bold initiative, and resolute determination served to inspire his men and provide the impetus needed to carry out the mission after he was medically evacuated by helicopter. His extraordinary courage under fire, and his selfless devotion to duty sustain and enhance the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=98936
 
#9
Vietnamin veteraani saa Medal of Honorin 31.6.2017.


Michigan high school teacher, coach to receive Medal of Honor
By Mr. David Vergun (Army News Service)June 13, 2017


1 / 2 Hide Caption – U.S. Army Pfc. James McCloughan, 1969. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of James McCloughan) VIEW ORIGINAL

2 / 2 Hide Caption – U.S. Army Pfc. James McCloughan, posing in front of the Vietnam Regional Exchange Snack Shop, 1969. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of James McCloughan) VIEW ORIGINAL
WASHINGTON (Army News Service) -- The White House announced today that on July 31, President Donald Trump will present the Medal of Honor to Spc. 5 James C. McCloughan.

McCloughan's valorous actions occurred during 48 hours of intense fighting against enemy forces on Nui Yon Hill near Tam Kỳ, South Vietnam, May 13 to 15, 1969. The combat medic was serving with Company C, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division.

A private first class at the time, McCloughan voluntarily risked his life to rescue wounded and disoriented personnel. Despite being personally wounded by shrapnel and small-arms fire, McCloughan refused medical evacuation. Instead, he opted to stay with his unit, where he continued to brave enemy fire so that he could rescue, treat and defend his wounded comrades.

While moving the wounded onto medical evacuation helicopters, his platoon leader ordered him to join them. But he said he disobeyed the order, telling the lieutenant, "You're going to need me."

The next day, elements of his battalion were getting probed by the North Vietnamese army. His own platoon had stood down and was recovering in the relatively quiet sector of Landing Zone Center, also in the vicinity of Tam Kỳ. McCloughan joined another platoon for a scouting mission. The platoon was ambushed and the other platoon medic was killed, leaving McCloughan as the sole medical specialist in the company.

Through intense battle, McCloughan was wounded a second time by small arms fire and shrapnel from a rocket propelled grenade while rendering aid to two Soldiers in an open rice paddy.

In the final phases of the attack, two companies from the NVA and an element of 700 soldiers from a Viet Cong regiment descended upon Company C's position on three sides. McCloughan, again with complete disregard for this life, went into the crossfire numerous times throughout the battle to extract wounded Soldiers, while also fighting the enemy.

In the early morning of May 15, McCloughan knocked out an RPG position with a grenade. He continued to fight, treat casualties and eliminate enemy soldiers until he collapsed from dehydration and exhaustion.

During the battle, 17 men were lost to enemy fire and many more were wounded, he said. Over the 48-hour battle McCloughan risked his life on nine separate occasions and is credited with saving the lives of 10 members of his company.

McCloughan admitted that during the intense battle, it was surreal to be shooting at the enemy one moment and treating wounded North Vietnamese soldiers, as well as American Soldiers, the next.

DREAM JOB DEFERRED

McCloughan said that he never had his sights set on being in the military, much less becoming a hero. But when his country called him to serve, he said he willingly answered that call and later did what he had to do to save lives on the field of battle.

McCloughan graduated in June 1968 from Olivet College in Michigan, with a degree in sociology and a teaching certificate. He received an offer to teach and coach football at South Haven High School in South Haven, Michigan -- the town where he was born. It was his dream job, he said.

A short time later, he received a draft notice. He entered the Army, Aug. 29, 1968. His teaching and coaching plans were put on hold while he served his two-year enlistment.

In 1970, he returned home and was re-accepted at South Haven High School, where for 40 years he taught psychology, sociology and geography. He also coached football, wrestling, and baseball.

McCloughan was inducted into the Michigan High School Coaches Association Hall of Fame, Michigan High School Football Association Coaches Hall of Fame, the Michigan High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame and the Olivet College Athletic Hall of Fame.

Now 71 and retired, McCloughan said that during his time teaching and coaching, he never talked about his Vietnam experiences. He said many of those experiences were very painful and he has only recently opened up about them.
https://www.army.mil/article/188013?g
 

Kapiainen

Ylipäällikkö
#10
Usein kun puhutaan menestyneistä suomalaistaustaisista USA:n armeijassa, tulee mieleen Törni, Keravuori, Marttinen jne.
Kuvassa Medal of Honor:lla palkittu suomalaissyntyinen USA:n armeijan sotilas, josta harva on koskaan edes kuullut.
Johannes S Anderson.
 

Liitteet

Sardaukar

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
#11
Usein kun puhutaan menestyneistä suomalaistaustaisista USA:n armeijassa, tulee mieleen Törni, Keravuori, Marttinen jne.
Kuvassa Medal of Honor:lla palkittu suomalaissyntyinen USA:n armeijan sotilas, josta harva on koskaan edes kuullut.
Johannes S Anderson.
Kova jätkä.
 

aj77

Ylipäällikkö
#13
Yksi toimi joka nostaa aina piilevän patriotismin on vuoden 44 suurhyökkäyksen aikana yritetty vihollisen motititus Tali-Ihantalan melskeessä. Kun siihen yrittää kuvitella olosuhteet missä se tehtiin. Sitä ei osata arvostaa ja sitä rinnastetaan liikaa edellisiin mottitaisteluihin, vaikka tilanne oli täysin erilainen.

Kun maailman suurin armeija laittoi ranttaliksi pikkumaata vastaan,ja tuhosi kaiken tieltään,niin armeijamme yritti silti aloitetta ja koittivat moittaa tämän suurvallan armeijan. Koottiin kolme ryhmää kolmesta suunnasta ja lähdettiin ylivoimaista vihollista motittamaan.
Motitus ei onnistunut. Voima ei riittänyt,mutta laittoi varmasti vihollisen takaraivoon ajatuksen asiasta.

Eriasia on, että mitäs jos se motitus olisi onnistunut? Mitäs sitten oltaisiin tehty,kun meillä olisi ollut kuuluisat läpimurto ja kaaritinporukat motissa?
 
#14
Yksi toimi joka nostaa aina piilevän patriotismin on vuoden 44 suurhyökkäyksen aikana yritetty vihollisen motititus Tali-Ihantalan melskeessä. Kun siihen yrittää kuvitella olosuhteet missä se tehtiin. Sitä ei osata arvostaa ja sitä rinnastetaan liikaa edellisiin mottitaisteluihin, vaikka tilanne oli täysin erilainen.

Kun maailman suurin armeija laittoi ranttaliksi pikkumaata vastaan,ja tuhosi kaiken tieltään,niin armeijamme yritti silti aloitetta ja koittivat moittaa tämän suurvallan armeijan. Koottiin kolme ryhmää kolmesta suunnasta ja lähdettiin ylivoimaista vihollista motittamaan.
Motitus ei onnistunut. Voima ei riittänyt,mutta laittoi varmasti vihollisen takaraivoon ajatuksen asiasta.

Eriasia on, että mitäs jos se motitus olisi onnistunut? Mitäs sitten oltaisiin tehty,kun meillä olisi ollut kuuluisat läpimurto ja kaaritinporukat motissa?
Laukaistu motti, eli tuhottu motitettu vihollinen.
 

Vonka

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
ELSO 3.0
#15
Yksi toimi joka nostaa aina piilevän patriotismin on vuoden 44 suurhyökkäyksen aikana yritetty vihollisen motititus Tali-Ihantalan melskeessä. Kun siihen yrittää kuvitella olosuhteet missä se tehtiin. Sitä ei osata arvostaa ja sitä rinnastetaan liikaa edellisiin mottitaisteluihin, vaikka tilanne oli täysin erilainen.

Kun maailman suurin armeija laittoi ranttaliksi pikkumaata vastaan,ja tuhosi kaiken tieltään,niin armeijamme yritti silti aloitetta ja koittivat moittaa tämän suurvallan armeijan. Koottiin kolme ryhmää kolmesta suunnasta ja lähdettiin ylivoimaista vihollista motittamaan.
Motitus ei onnistunut. Voima ei riittänyt,mutta laittoi varmasti vihollisen takaraivoon ajatuksen asiasta.

Eriasia on, että mitäs jos se motitus olisi onnistunut? Mitäs sitten oltaisiin tehty,kun meillä olisi ollut kuuluisat läpimurto ja kaaritinporukat motissa?
Lagus johti hyökkäyksen. Voima vain ei yksinkertaisesti riittänyt pussin sulkemiseen. Jäi kahden kilometrin aukko.

Ajatuksena oli heti Viipurin jälkeen saada kulutettua läpimurtojoukot, kun vain saadaan ne vesistökannaksille ja liike vähän pitemmäksi. Ja niin tietysti tapahtuikin. Tuossa näkee, miten puolustukseen on yritetty rakentaa syvyyttä kaikilla mahdollisilla taistelualueelle haalituilla porukoilla.

Tilanne 27.6.1944. Siellä oli venäläistä kyllä joka metrille mutta tuli heille ihan järkyttäviä tappioitakin. Neuvostoarkistoja ristiinvalottamalla Tapio Tiihonen arvioi venäläisten kokonaistappioksi 189 000 miestä. Hänen tutkimustensa perusteella Kannaksella haavoittui tai kuoli 1 000–1 400 Leningradin Rintaman sotilasta kilometriä kohden.


 
#16
Lagus johti hyökkäyksen. Voima vain ei yksinkertaisesti riittänyt pussin sulkemiseen. Jäi kahden kilometrin aukko.

Ajatuksena oli heti Viipurin jälkeen saada kulutettua läpimurtojoukot, kun vain saadaan ne vesistökannaksille ja liike vähän pitemmäksi. Ja niin tietysti tapahtuikin. Tuossa näkee, miten puolustukseen on yritetty rakentaa syvyyttä kaikilla mahdollisilla taistelualueelle haalituilla porukoilla.

Tilanne 27.6.1944. Siellä oli venäläistä kyllä joka metrille mutta tuli heille ihan järkyttäviä tappioitakin. Neuvostoarkistoja ristiinvalottamalla Tapio Tiihonen arvioi venäläisten kokonaistappioksi 189 000 miestä. Hänen tutkimustensa perusteella Kannaksella haavoittui tai kuoli 1 000–1 400 Leningradin Rintaman sotilasta kilometriä kohden.


Jukka Mäkelän kirjoissahan kuvataan, miten IV AKE:ssa suunniteltiin, että pitäisi painaa motti kiinni Leitimojärven yläpuolelta (kuten tehtiin), mutta jättää pussin pohja auki, jolloin kaartindivisioonat olisivat "iskeneet tyhjään", kun vastassa ei olisi ollut ketään, kunnes Vihman 6.D olisi topannut hyökkäyksen viimeistään Lappeenrantaan ja sitten huoltoa vaille jääneet divisioonat olisi tuhottu. Suomalainen muunnelma Mannsteinin "kostajan miekasta". Laatikainen halusi nukkua, eikä jaksanut kommentoida alaistensa suunnitelmia. Nyt se mm. JR 6:n ja JR 48:n joukkojen vastarinta varmisti sen, että "panssarimakkaran" voima pysyi suppealla alueella, eikä suomalaisten voima riittänyt sen tuhoamiseen/lyömiseen.

Uhkapeliä tietenkin tuokin suunnitelma, mutta teoriassa mahdollinen.
 

Vonka

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
ELSO 3.0
#17
Uhkapeliä tietenkin tuokin suunnitelma, mutta teoriassa mahdollinen.
Uhkapeliä, koska sieltä Juustilan sulkujen takaa, siis Lappeenrannasta, aukesi jo silloin niin monta tietä syvälle sisä-Suomeen että kukahan ne kaikki olisi sulkenut...
 
#18
Uhkapeliä, koska sieltä Juustilan sulkujen takaa, siis Lappeenrannasta, aukesi jo silloin niin monta tietä syvälle sisä-Suomeen että kukahan ne kaikki olisi sulkenut...
Mutta siis pointti olikin siinä, että se panssariarmeija ei liiku ilman paukkuja ja pensaa ja se iskuvoima menee hukkaan, kun ei ole vastusta, jota iskeä. Eli, kun tiedettiin, että Lappeenrantaan oli kaarti menossa, niin ohjataan se sinne, mutta pannaan huolto takaa poikki. Vastassa on kokonainen Vihman divisioona, josta tiedettiin, että se on hyvä (muttei sitä, miten hyvä).
 
#19
Vietnamin sodan veteraani sai Kongressin kunniamitalin.

Pentagon Enshrines Medal of Honor Soldier in Hall of Heroes
By Jim Garamone DoD News, Defense Media Activity


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WASHINGTON, Aug. 1, 2017 — It was love that inspired then-Army Pfc. James C. McCloughan to perform acts of heroism in 1969 that were finally recognized by the award of the Medal of Honor at the White House yesterday and his induction into the Hall of Heroes at the Pentagon today.




Spc. 5 James C. McCloughan speaks during his Medal of Honor Hall of Heroes induction ceremony at the Pentagon, Aug. 1, 2017. McCloughan distinguished himself during 48 hours of close combat against enemy forces in Vietnam, May 13-15, 1969. At the time, then-Pfc. McCloughan was serving as a combat medic with Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 196th Light Infantry Brigade. DoD photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brigitte N. Brantley
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Acting Army Secretary Robert M. Speer, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley and Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey presided at the standing-room-only ceremony at the Pentagon enshrining McCloughan into the Hall of Heroes.

McCloughan said he is holding the award as a tribute to the 89 men who fought at the Battle of Nui Yon Hill in the Republic of South Vietnam on May 13-15, 1969. The Michigan native was a medic -- the “Doc” -- with Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 196th Light Infantry Brigade, and he saved at least 10 lives under fire, while being wounded three times during the battle.

The medic rose to the rank of specialist 5 before he got out of the service and returned home to his home town in Michigan to be a teacher and coach. He spent more than 40 years imparting the lessons he learned during that battle and others to countless students.

Life Lessons

McCloughan said the biggest lesson he learned from his experiences in Vietnam was the importance of the team.

“Life is not measured by the breaths that we take, but by the moments that take our breath away,” he said. “The men of Charlie Company did things that would take your breath away. They looked into the face of danger and death, and with backs to the wall we fought for each other until the enemy was beaten and went away.”

Video Player
00:00 | 00:17

VIDEO | 00:17 | MoH Recipient: Heroism Driven by Love
McCloughan said he has been a part of many groups that carry the label "team," and the men of Charlie Company was the epitome of the concept. “When you hope and believe, when you have faith in God and each other, when you have love for someone or something bigger than yourself; anything can be accomplished,” the Doc said. “These men -- my brothers -- are living proof that faith, hope and love abide. But the greatest of these is love.”

It took 48 years for McCloughan to receive the Medal of Honor. After the battle, he was recommended for a Distinguished Service Cross, but that was downgraded to a Bronze Star with a Valor device. In 2009, the men of Charlie Company revived the push for McCloughan to receive the DSC, but then-Defense Secretary Ash Carter upgraded the action to the Medal of Honor. It was approved at the end of December and President Donald J. Trump presented the award to McCloughan during a White House ceremony yesterday.

“I tell you sir, that while this honor is long overdue, it comes in earnest,” Mattis said during the induction ceremony. “We are very, very honored to have you and your bride and your family here today. We stand in respect for you and your warrior brothers and your heroic sacrifices.”

During the battle, McCloughan repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to reach and treat his fellow soldiers, Mattis said. His company commander saw his wounds and ordered the medic to evacuate. His reply: “They are going to need me.”

Outnumbered

The company was outnumbered 28 to one, Mattis said, and it was only due to the fighting qualities of the unit and the liberal application of air and artillery support that the company held off elements of two full companies of North Vietnamese regulars and about 2,000 Viet Cong for two full days.

At night, when supplies were running low, McCloughan volunteered to wear a strobe light on his helmet in an open field so helicopters could drop supplies to the beleaguered company, Mattis said. The strobe was beacon of hope for resupply, but it was also a magnet for enemy rounds and rocket-propelled grenades. The helicopters couldn’t make it: The landing zone was too hot.

“He saved the lives of 10 members of his company on those days, but he touched 10,000 lives over the next 40 years in the classroom and on the athletic fields,” Mattis said. “To the boys of Charlie Company: Thank you. Jim held the beacon for you that night in 1969. Today he is the beacon and we are humbled and honored in holding him high -- a guide to others to keep their soles clean and always do the best they can and also serve each other.”
https://www.defense.gov/News/Articl...soldier-in-hall-of-heroes/source/GovDelivery/
 
#20
Tällä kertaa erikoisjoukkojen lääkintämies Laosin operaatiosta.

Vietnam War Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for actions in Laos
By C. Todd Lopez, Army News ServiceSeptember 20, 2017



1 / 3 Show Caption + Retired Army Capt. Gary Michael Rose will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony on Oct. 23, the White House announced today. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo ) VIEW ORIGINAL

2 / 3 Show Caption + Then-Sgt. Gary Rose in Kontum, Vietnam, 1970. Retired Capt. Gary Michael Rose will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony on Oct. 23, the White House announced today. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of Gary M. Rose) VIEW ORIGINAL

3 / 3 Show Caption + Pfc. Gary M. Rose at Fort Benning, Ga., September 1967. Retired Capt. Gary Michael Rose will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony on Oct. 23, the White House announced today. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of Gary M. Rose) VIEW ORIGINAL
WASHINGTON -- The White House announced today that retired Army Capt. Gary Michael Rose will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony on Oct. 23.

President Donald Trump will present the medal, which commemorates Rose's heroic actions in Laos during a four-day mission, Sept. 11-14, 1970.

Rose served as a medic during the Vietnam War. As part of the Army's Special Forces, Rose took part in missions in nearby Laos that were meant, in part, to engage with North Vietnamese Army troops who had amassed there, and to possibly prevent them from returning to the larger fight back in Vietnam.

Laos, a landlocked nation in the center of the Southeast Asian peninsula, shares a 1,300-mile border with Vietnam, to the east. While conflict raged on in Vietnam, North Vietnamese forces used Laos to their own advantage -- forcing the American military to also enter the country at times to stop the progress of the NVA through its jungles.

During one mission in Laos, called "Operation Tailwind," which began, Sept. 11, 1970, Rose, then a sergeant, along with one other Vietnamese medic, was responsible for providing medical care to a company-sized element of special forces troops made up of 16 American Soldiers and 120 Montagnards.

Under Rose's care, all 16 American Soldiers returned alive from that mission, though many were injured in some way. A total of three Montagnard soldiers would be killed by the time that four-day mission had ended.

One of the most unexpected parts of that mission happened when all involved thought the task was all but over. Four helicopters had been dispatched to bring the team home from their mission in Laos.

Rose said that the entire company was able to board just the first three helicopters, leaving the fourth unused. Rose, along with about 30 others who were involved in Operation Tailwind, boarded the third helicopter to head home.

On the way back to safety, that third helicopter crashed to the ground, injuring many on board, and killing one Montagnard soldier.

Rose knew the helicopter might explode as a result of that crash. He ignored his own injuries -- which included not just those that resulted from the crash, but also injuries sustained earlier in the mission from a rocket-propelled grenade -- and re-entered the crashed helicopter to pull soldiers to safety.

Shortly after that crash, the fourth helicopter, which was empty, arrived to pick them up and bring them home.

Rose said he is honored to be selected for the Medal of Honor, but maintains that it is the entirety of Soldiers within the Military Assistance Command Studies and Observations Group, the unit in which he served, that the medal is actually for.

"There were only about 2,000 people who were ever in MACSOG from 1965 to 1972," Rose said.

"I can tell you that our raids and our reconnaissance into Laos tied up some 40,000 to 50,000 NVA troops originally sent going south to fight American units."

Rose pointed to the 58,000 names on the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. He said he thinks there might have been more names on the wall if MACSOG Soldiers hadn't prevented NVA troops amassed in Laos from moving south to become involved in the fighting.

"That medal, to me, recognizes finally the service of all the men in all those years that served in MACSOG. It's a collective medal from my perspective," he said, which represents "all the courage and honor and dedication to duty that those men served."

Rose said he is also excited to visit Washington, D.C., and the White House, and to meet with the president.

"How many people get the chance to meet the president of the United States?" he asked. "I am going to have the privilege of being able to meet the president of the United States with my dear wife, in the Oval Office, I have been told. And that is something I will treasure until the end of my days."

Rose grew up in southern California, and enlisted in the Army in 1967. He attended basic training at Fort Ord. After, he was sent to Fort Gordon, Georgia, for advanced individual training, where he learned to be a mortarman. But while there, he caught the eye of Special Forces recruiters, who recruited him and later trained him to be a combat medic.

After his tour in Vietnam, Rose opted to pursue a commission in the Army. His career took him to, among other places, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, and Panama. Also during his Army career, he met and married his wife, Margaret. The two have been together for over 45 years now. Rose served 20-years in the Army, and retired in 1987, as a captain.
https://www.army.mil/article/193729?g
 
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