Perus- ja jatkokoulutus ja urapolut Yhdysvaltain asevoimissa

Stagideus

Majuri
Lahjoittaja
#1
Aloitin uuden threadin aihepiiriä varten (parempaa otsikointia saa ehdottaa, tämän enempää ei aamukahvin äärellä ilman mörköä yläpellissä irtoa)

Eli homman nimi on keskustella ja tuoda esille lähtein yms. Sotilaan perus- ja jatkokoulutuksen järkestelyitä Yhdysvaltain asevoimien eri puolustushaaroissa. Tämä voidaan myös rajata käsittelemään ainoastaan Armeijaa ja perustaa ketjut erikseen muille.
 

Stagideus

Majuri
Lahjoittaja
#2
Aloitan uutisella, jonka takia loin tämän uuden topikin:

Yhdysvaltain Armeija pidentää jalkaväkisotilaan peruskoulutusta 8 viikolla.

Tarkoituksena on pidentää Basic Training-peruskoulutukseen (toiselta nimeltään Initial Entry Training tai infantry One Station Unit Training ) 9-viikkoisen peruskoulutuskauden (Basic Combat Training) lisäksi kuuluvaa 4,5 viikkoista erikoiskoulutuskautta (Advanced Individual Training) 8 viikolla. Luvassa on syvällisempää opetusta ja harjoittelua mm. suunnistamisessa ja paikanmäärityksessä, taistelu- ja rata-ammunnoissa, kalustokoulutusta, pimeätoimintaa, partion ja ryhmän taistelutekniikkaa, lähitaistelua, taisteluensiapua ja taistelupelastajan taitoja yms.

Tarve on tunnistettu yksikköihinsä kesken rotaatiokoulutuksen, tai pahimmillaan suoraan operaatiossa oleviin yksikköihin lähetettyjen tuoreiden jalkaväkisotilaiden osalta.

Army Will Add 2 Months to Infantry Course to Make Grunts More Lethal







Army Will Add 2 Months to Infantry Course to Make Grunts More Lethal



A U.S. Army Infantry soldier-in-training assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, engages the opposing force (OPFOR) May 2, 2017, with a M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) on a Stryker to provide support-by-fire during a squad training exercise. (U.S. Army photo/Patrick A. Albright)

Military.com
25 Jun 2018
By Matthew Cox

The U.S. Army is refining a plan to extend by two months the service's 14-week infantry one station unit training, or OSUT, so young grunts arrive at their first unit more combat-ready than ever before.
Trainers at Fort Benning, Georgia will run a pilot this summer that will extend infantry OSUT from 14 weeks to 22 weeks, giving soldiers more time to practice key infantry skills such as land navigation, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat, fire and maneuver and first aid training.

Currently soldiers in infantry OSUT go through nine weeks of Basic Combat Training and about 4.5 weeks of infantry advanced individual training. This would add an additional 8 weeks of advanced individual training, tripling the length of the instruction soldiers receive in that phase.
"It's more reps and sets; we are trying to make sure that infantry soldiers coming out of infantry OSUT are more than just familiar [with ground combat skills]," Col. Townley Hedrick, commandant of the Infantry School at Benning, told Military.com in a June 21 interview. "You are going to shoot more bullets; you are going to come out more proficient and more expert than just familiar."

A BETTER TRAINED INFANTRY SOLDIER
The former infantry commandant, Brig. Gen. Christopher Donahue, launched the effort to "improve the lethality of soldiers in the infantry rifle squad," Hedrick said.
"In 14 weeks, what we really do is produce a baseline infantry soldier," said Col. Kelly Kendrick, the outgoing commander of 198th Infantry Brigade at Benning, who was heavily involved in developing the pilot.
This works fine when new soldiers arrive at their first unit as it is starting its pre-deploymenttrain-up, Kendrick said.
Unfortunately, many young infantry soldiers arrive at a unit only a few weeks before it deploys, leaving little time for preparation before real-world operations begin, he said.
"I was the G3 of the 101st Airborne and if a [new] soldier came up late in the train-up, we had a three-week train-up program and then after three weeks, we would send that soldier on a deployment," he said.

With 22 weeks of infantry OSUT, "you can see right off that bat, we are going to have a hell of a lot better soldier," Kendrick said. "I will tell you, we will produce infantry soldiers with unmatched lethality compared to what we have had in the past."

The new pilot will start training two companies from July 13 to mid-December, Kendrick said. Once the new program of instruction is finalized, trainers will start implementing the 22-week cycle across infantry OSUT in October 2019.
The effort follows an Army-wide redesign of Basic Combat Training earlier this year, designed to instill more discipline and esprit de corps in young soldiers after leaders from around the Army complained that new soldiers were displaying a lack of obedience, poor work ethic and low discipline.

"If there are two things we do great right now, that's physical fitness and marksmanship; I really think everything else has suffered a little bit," said Kendrick. "If you went and looked at special operations forces ... the SOF force has realized they have to invest in training and teaching. And they have done that, so we have been the last ones to get it."

The Army has prioritized leader training for both commissioned officers and sergeants.
"[But] the initial entry, soldier side of the house, has not [changed] whole lot from the infantry perspective for a long, long time," Kendrick said.

A NEW EMPHASIS ON LAND NAVIGATION TRAINING
Currently, soldiers in infantry training receive one day of classroom instruction on land navigation and one day of hands-on application.
"We put them in groups of four and they go and find three of about four-five points -- that's their land navigation training," Kendrick.
The new land-nav program will last a week.
"They are going to do buddy teams to start with, and at the end, they will have to pass day and night land navigation, individually," he said.
One challenge of the pilot will be, "can I get to individual proficiency in land-nav or do I need more time?" Kendrick said.
"Part of this what we haven't figured out is hey, how long do those lanes need to be -- 300, 600, 800 meters?" said Kendrick, adding that it would be easy to design a course "and have every private here fail."
"Then I can turn around and have every private pass no matter what with just a highway through the woods," he continued. "We've got to figure out what that level is going to be -- where they leave here accomplished in their skills and their ability and are prepared to go do that well wherever they get to. That is really the art of doing this pilot."

A NEW MARKSMANSHIP STRATEGY
Currently, infantry OSUT soldiers train on iron sights and the M68 close combat optic at ranges out to 300 meters.
The new program will feature training on the Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight, or AGOG, which offers 4X magnification.
"We don't do much ACOG training; you go out to most rifle units, the ACOG is part of the unit's issue," Kendrick said. "It's a shame that we don't train them on the optic that half of them when they walk into their unit the first day and [receive it]."
Soldiers will also receive training on the AN/PAS-13 thermal weapon sight and the AN/PSQ-20 Enhanced Night Vision Goggle.
Soldiers will train with these system and their weapons "day and night with qualification associated," Kendrick said.
The new program will also increase the amount of maneuver live-fire training soldiers receive.
"Everything from a buddy-team to a fire team to a squad, we are going to increase the time and sets and repetitions in getting them into live-firing, day and night," Kendrick said. "Today when you do a fire-team, react to contact live fire, you do that twice -- daytime only. At the end of this thing, when you are done, we will be doing live-fire [repetitions] on the magnitude of 20-plus."
As with land navigation, Kendrick said, the time allotted for additional marksmanship training is not yet finalized.
"Like anything else, with being an infantryman, it's sets and reps that make you proficient," he said. "So now we are talking about the time to do that amount of sets and repetitions that will give them the foundation that can they can work in the rest of their career."

MORE COMBATIVES AND FIRST AID TRAINING
Infantry OSUT trainees receive about 22 hours of combatives, or hand-to-hand combat training.
"We are going to take that to 40 hours," Kendrick said. "At the end of 40 hours, we are going to take a level-one combatives test, so every soldier that leaves here will be level-one combatives certified."
Level-one certification will ensure soldiers are practiced in basic holds instead of just being familiar with them, Kendrick said.
"We are talking about practicing and executing those moves."
It will be the same with first aid training, he said.
Soldiers will spend eight days learning more combat lifesaver training, trauma first aid and "how to handle hot and cold-weather injuries ... which cause more casualties than bullets do right now in some of these formations," Kendrick said.
"You will have a soldier that understands combat lifesaver, first aid and trauma, all those things because right now you just get a little piece of that," he said.
Infantry trainees will also receive more urban combat training and do a 16-mile road march instead of the standard 12-miler, Kendrick said.
The plan is to "assess this every week" during the pilot and make changes if needed, Kendrick said.
"Is it going to be enough? Do we need more? Those are all the things we are going to work out in this pilot," he said. "In December, there will be a couple of 14-week companies that graduate at the same time, so part of this is to send both of those groups of soldiers out to units in the Army and get the units' feedback on the product."
The effort is designed to give soldiers more exposure to the infantry tasks that make a "solid infantryman here instead of making that happen at their first unit of assignment," Kendrick said. "This is really going to produce that lethal soldier that can plug into his unit from day one."

-- Matthew Cox can be reached at matthew.cox@military.com.

Related Topics
Military Headlines Army Fort Benning Army Training Infantrymen
© Copyright 2018 Military.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
SPONSORED LINK
Ready to Separate? Download the Transition App
 
#3
Onko siis jenkkien näkökulmasta jalkaväen sotilas ollut valmis sotatoimiin/lähetettäväksi kentälle 9+4,5 viikon jälkeen? Vai kuinka kauan maavoimat tai merijalkaväki kouluttaa perusmosuria ennen lähettämistä toiminta-alueelle?
 

Stagideus

Majuri
Lahjoittaja
#4
Kyllä ja ei. Maailmalla ei asiat mene niinkuin Suomessa... Vaikka tunnistettaisiin heikkouksia järjestelmässä, olosuhteiden pakosta nostetaan kädet pystyyn ja mennään eteenpäin.
Tokihan siis tuon peruskoulutuksen lisäksi käydään aselaji- ja koulutushaarakurssit (laskuvarjosotilas hyppykurssin, lääkintämiehet lämärikurssin, heitinmiehet heitinkurssin, pst-miehet pst-kurssin yms.) ennen yksikköönsä liittymistä.
Pahimmillaan viimeisen 15 vuoden aikana tilanne on tosiaan ollut se, että jengi lentää suoraan operaatioalueella olevaan yksikköönsä koulutuksesta, mutta usein onneksi sentään ovat päässeet edes pariksi viimeiseksi viikoksi tai koko ajaksi yksikköönsä sen ollessa vielä rotaatiokoulutuksessa ennen operaatioalueelle lähtemistä.

Sota-aikana toki operaatiotempo asettaa omat rajoitteensa, kuten myös se, että vapaaehtoisista koostuvalla ammattiarmeijalla ei ole käytettävissään tiettyä määrää ikäluokasta tasaisen varmasti, vaan rulliin saadaan just sen verran jengiä, kuin mitä kävelee rekrytoimiston ovesta sisään ja saadaan puhuttua ja huijattua messiin, sekä kirjoittamaan jatkosopparin ekan loppuun lusittuaan.

Yhdysvaltalainen ja mikä tahansa muu ammattiarmeija eroaa perustavalla tavalla omastamme siltä osin, miten joukkoja tuotetaan. Me koulutamme reserviin kokonaisia joukkotuotettuja yksiköitä, kun muualla annetaan yksittäisille sotilaille perus- ja jatkokoulutusta, jonka jälkeen he pääasiassa liittyvät olemassa oleviin kokoonpanoihin täydennyksinä. Loppu on työssäoppimista oman yksikön mukana harjoituksissa, koulutuksessa ja tehtävällä.

Tässä systeemissä toki johtajilla on miehistöä huomattavasti enemmän palvelusta takana ja yksittäisen jalkaväkisotilaan lähin esimies on yleensä aina häntä kokeneempi (partionjohtaja, ryhmänjohtaja).
Joukkueenjohtajat toki sitten taas ovat tuoreita upseereita, joista joillakin voi toki olla aiempaa palvelusta miehistössä takana. Näitä ohjastamassa on joukkueessa vanhempi aliupseeri, jolla on yleensä kokemusta ja näkemystä. JoJo käskee, AU toteuttaa.
 
Viimeksi muokattu:

Sardaukar

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
#5
Myöskin on mahdollista (kuten ylempänä on asiaa sivuttu) lähettää lupaava Enlisted paikkaan nimeltä Officer Candidate School. Eli tietty osa upseereista on aikaisemmin palvellut värvättynä (enlisted).

Ongelma US Army:n koulutusasioissa on (mielestäni) aivan hirmuinen ymmärrysrailo upseerin ja miehistön välillä. Tuoreella upseerilla (pl. OCS-porukka) ei ole mitään käsitystä esim. normi-rivisotilaan arjesta tai kokemuksista. Kun ainoa laajempi kosketus asevoimiin on esim. West Point, jossa ollaan samassa kaveripiirissä. Tätä sitten koetetaan paikata ns. SNCO:n (senior non-commissioned officer), yleensä joukkueessa ylikersantti (Staff Sergeant, E-6), avulla. Käytännön asioissahan joukkueen vanhin aliupseeri johtaa joukkuetta, ei se West Pointista juuri tullut 2nd LT (vänrikki).
 
#6
Ongelma US Army:n koulutusasioissa on (mielestäni) aivan hirmuinen ymmärrysrailo upseerin ja miehistön välillä. Tuoreella upseerilla (pl. OCS-porukka) ei ole mitään käsitystä esim. normi-rivisotilaan arjesta tai kokemuksista. Kun ainoa laajempi kosketus asevoimiin on esim. West Point, jossa ollaan samassa kaveripiirissä. Tätä sitten koetetaan paikata ns. SNCO:n (senior non-commissioned officer), yleensä joukkueessa ylikersantti (Staff Sergeant, E-6), avulla. Käytännön asioissahan joukkueen vanhin aliupseeri johtaa joukkuetta, ei se West Pointista juuri tullut 2nd LT (vänrikki).
Samaa mieltä asiasta, jenkkien brittiläisperäinen koulutusperinne ei ole enää parhaimmillaan (sitten 1800-luvun :p). Meillä käytössä oleva saksalainen koulutusperinne on tässä selkeästi toimivampi. Olisi mielenkiintoista nähdä kuinka paljon vastustusta koulutuksen muutos saksalaistyyppiseen aiheuttaisi...
 

EK

Kenraali
#7
Samaa mieltä asiasta, jenkkien brittiläisperäinen koulutusperinne ei ole enää parhaimmillaan (sitten 1800-luvun :p). Meillä käytössä oleva saksalainen koulutusperinne on tässä selkeästi toimivampi. Olisi mielenkiintoista nähdä kuinka paljon vastustusta koulutuksen muutos saksalaistyyppiseen aiheuttaisi...
Käsittääkseni/mielestäni/nähdäkseni vaatisi melkoista yhteiskunnallista muutosta.

Jenkeissä ja briteillä on luokkayhteiskunta, meillä ei.
 

EK

Kenraali
#8
Kyllä ja ei. Maailmalla ei asiat mene niinkuin Suomessa... Vaikka tunnistettaisiin heikkouksia järjestelmässä, olosuhteiden pakosta nostetaan kädet pystyyn ja mennään eteenpäin.
Tokihan siis tuon peruskoulutuksen lisäksi käydään aselaji- ja koulutushaarakurssit (laskuvarjosotilas hyppykurssin, lääkintämiehet lämärikurssin, heitinmiehet heitinkurssin, pst-miehet pst-kurssin yms.) ennen yksikköönsä liittymistä.
Pahimmillaan viimeisen 15 vuoden aikana tilanne on tosiaan ollut se, että jengi lentää suoraan operaatioalueella olevaan yksikköönsä koulutuksesta, mutta usein onneksi sentään ovat päässeet edes pariksi viimeiseksi viikoksi tai koko ajaksi yksikköönsä sen ollessa vielä rotaatiokoulutuksessa ennen operaatioalueelle lähtemistä.

Sota-aikana toki operaatiotempo asettaa omat rajoitteensa, kuten myös se, että vapaaehtoisista koostuvalla ammattiarmeijalla ei ole käytettävissään tiettyä määrää ikäluokasta tasaisen varmasti, vaan rulliin saadaan just sen verran jengiä, kuin mitä kävelee rekrytoimiston ovesta sisään ja saadaan puhuttua ja huijattua messiin, sekä kirjoittamaan jatkosopparin ekan loppuun lusittuaan.

Yhdysvaltalainen ja mikä tahansa muu ammattiarmeija eroaa perustavalla tavalla omastamme siltä osin, miten joukkoja tuotetaan. Me koulutamme reserviin kokonaisia joukkotuotettuja yksiköitä, kun muualla annetaan yksittäisille sotilaille perus- ja jatkokoulutusta, jonka jälkeen he pääasiassa liittyvät olemassa oleviin kokoonpanoihin täydennyksinä. Loppu on työssäoppimista oman yksikön mukana harjoituksissa, koulutuksessa ja tehtävällä.

Tässä systeemissä toki johtajilla on miehistöä huomattavasti enemmän palvelusta takana ja yksittäisen jalkaväkisotilaan lähin esimies on yleensä aina häntä kokeneempi (partionjohtaja, ryhmänjohtaja).
Joukkueenjohtajat toki sitten taas ovat tuoreita upseereita, joista joillakin voi toki olla aiempaa palvelusta miehistössä takana. Näitä ohjastamassa on joukkueessa vanhempi aliupseeri, jolla on yleensä kokemusta ja näkemystä. JoJo käskee, AU toteuttaa.
Tähän voisi heittää hieman vanhahtavan kommentin jenkkien harrastamasta rotaatiosta.

Luettuani Pacific-teosta, yllätyin siitä, että jo toisessa maailmansodassa Tyynellä valtamerellä merijalkaväki kierrätti joukkoja, eli useampaan taisteluun osallistuneet veteraanit siirrettiin kotijoukkoihin. Sama sitten jatkui Vietnamissa (vuoden rotaatio) ja osittain nyt Afganistanissa ja Irakissa.

Tämä yhdistettynä koulutuksen/sosio-ekonomisen -taustan mukaan valikoivaan johtaja- yms. koulutukseen, tuloksena on melkoisen heterogeeninen porukka. Hyvät ovat tietenkin hyviä, mutta tykinruoka-porukka on sitten jotain ihan muuta.
 

adam7

Ylipäällikkö
#9
Samaa mieltä asiasta, jenkkien brittiläisperäinen koulutusperinne ei ole enää parhaimmillaan (sitten 1800-luvun :p). Meillä käytössä oleva saksalainen koulutusperinne on tässä selkeästi toimivampi. Olisi mielenkiintoista nähdä kuinka paljon vastustusta koulutuksen muutos saksalaistyyppiseen aiheuttaisi...
Vaikka topicci on jenkkilälä, heitän tähän yhden huomion, joka koskee nimenomaan tuota upseeripolkua. Naapurissa Ruotsissa on tällä hetkellä niin kova upseeripula, että ovat luoneet erillisen koulutusken henkilöille joilla on valmiiksi akateeminen tutkinto. Eli nämä eivät joudu enää morteiksi morttien sekaan kun aloittavat, vaan lukevat lyhyemmän sotilaskoulutuksen maanpuolustuskorkeakoulussa. Muistaakseni nyt noin sadan hengen satsi ekalla kerralla. Eli hieman tuollaisen brittiperinteen mukaisesti, kun perinteisesti ovat käyttäneet tuota saksalaismallia jossa jokainen aloittaa alkokkaana (vaikka Ruotsissa jo kutsunnoissa, joissa on palikkatestit ja psykologit ja fyysiset testit päätetään ketkä myöhemmin ovat aliupseereja tai meidän reservinupseereja vastaavia jatkossa).
 
Tykkäykset: EK
#10
Onko siis jenkkien näkökulmasta jalkaväen sotilas ollut valmis sotatoimiin/lähetettäväksi kentälle 9+4,5 viikon jälkeen? Vai kuinka kauan maavoimat tai merijalkaväki kouluttaa perusmosuria ennen lähettämistä toiminta-alueelle?
Olen eräällä toisella foorumilla jäsenenä, ja kyseisellä foorumilla on yllättävän paljonkin joko aktiivipalveluksessa olevia sotilaita tai veteraaneja/reservin jäseniä, ja tässä ketjussa onkin aloittaja noin 15 vuotta palvellut USA:n maavoimissa lääkintämiehenä, joten tietää hyvin myös jalkaväen puolesta, koska toimi heidän kanssaan.
https://forums.spacebattles.com/thr...to-expand-infantry-course-by-2-months.657144/

Kannattaa muuten tsekata yleisestikin tuota War Room - alafoorumia, koska sisältää hyvinkin paljon hyvää tietoa armeija-asioista.
 
Top