UAV / UCAV / LAR (robotit) Uutiset ja jutut

ctg

Greatest Leader
Turkey was able to circumvent a US export ban on killer drones with the help of a missile component first developed in the UK, allowing Ankara to become an emerging power in the lethal technology, which experts warn is dangerously proliferating.

The vital assistance from a factory in Brighton has helped Turkey on its way to become the second biggest user of armed drones in the world – one of a number of countries emulating methods first used by the US in its “war on terror”.

Turkish Bayraktar TB2 drones were heavily used in Ankara’s three operations to date against Kurdish-led forces in Syria, responsible for the killing of 449 individuals in one of them, amounting to a fifth of the officially declared fatalities.

They have also been used to kill what Turkey’s defence ministry said were “five PKK terrorists” across the border in Iraq this month, imitating the extraterritorial strikes pioneered by the US in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia.

But while the armed Bayraktar TB2 drones are manufactured by a Turkish company, they could not have been developed without the Hornet missile rack, which was devised and supplied by EDO MBM Technology, located on the outskirts of Brighton, somewhere around 2015.

An article in Jane’s Defence Review from May 2016 shows the Hornet was supplied to the Bayraktar TB2’s manufacturer Baykar at the crucial initial development stage. The Turkish company went on to develop its own missile racks.

Four years on, Turkey’s security forces run a fleet of 86 armed TB2s and the country is a fast emerging player in drone usage worldwide, a field that was dominated by the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK and Israel until three or four four years ago.
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/nov/27/revealed-uk-technology-turkey-rise-global-drone-power

Onneksi suomesta ei ole liikkunut teknologiaa turkkiin, vai onko?
 

ctg

Greatest Leader

Tämän hetkinen tulos näyttää harjoittelulta, mutta homma noiden kanssa on että kun ne on oppineet, kaikkea voi tehdä nopeammin niinkauan kun virtaa piisaa ja koneessa riittää kapasiteettia.
 

Tetra

Respected Leader
Eräästä ajankohtaisesta tapahtumasta inspiroituneena Youtube suositteli tätä videota minulle. Siistiä, mutta vaikuttavaa sisätyötä.

Videossa ei ole mitään erikoista tai uutta, mutta bitit on halpoja, joten miksipä en jakaisi.

 

Einomies1

Ylipäällikkö
Eräästä ajankohtaisesta tapahtumasta inspiroituneena Youtube suositteli tätä videota minulle. Siistiä, mutta vaikuttavaa sisätyötä.

Videossa ei ole mitään erikoista tai uutta, mutta bitit on halpoja, joten miksipä en jakaisi.

Nuo ohjauskeskukset ovat todella kehittyneitä ja monimutkaisia, eikä vähiten tuhansien kilometrien etäisyyden vuoksi. Melkoinen tietovuo pitää olla että saadaan isoja, aseistettuja droneja ohjailtua reaaliajassa maailman toiselta puolen. Lennokin pitää kuitenkin olla kohtalaisen nopeasti ohjattavissa ja sensorien sekä aseiden toimia sekuntien viiveellä korkeintaan.

Laskeutumiseen ja nousuun käytetään tietääkseni toimintakentällä olevia pilotteja paikallisissa keskuksissa. Melkoinen järjestelmä siis.
 

ctg

Greatest Leader

It’s going to be a very, very long time before robots come anywhere close to matching the power-efficient mobility of animals, especially at small scales. Lots of folks are working on making tiny robots, but another option is to just hijack animals directly, by turning them into cyborgs. We’ve seen this sort of thing before with beetles, but there are many other animals out there that can be cyborgized. Researchers at Stanford and Caltech are giving sea jellies a try, and remarkably, it seems as though cyborg enhancements actually make the jellies more capable than they were before.

Usually, co-opting the mobility system of an animal with electronics doesn’t improve things for the animal, because we’re not nearly as good at controlling animals as they are at controlling themselves. But when you look at animals with very simple control systems, like sea jellies, it turns out that with some carefully targeted stimulation, they can move faster and more efficiently than they do naturally.

The researchers, Nicole W. Xu and John O. Dabiri, chose a friendly sort of sea jelly called Aurelia aurita, which is “an oblate species of jellyfish comprising a flexible mesogleal bell and monolayer of coronal and radial muscles that line the subumbrellar surface,” so there you go. To swim, jellies actuate the muscles in their bells, which squeeze water out and propel them forwards. These muscle contractions are controlled by a relatively simple stimulus of the jelly’s nervous system that can be replicated through external electrical impulses.

When the going gets tough, future soft robots may break into a sweat to keep from overheating, much like marathon runners or ancient hunters chasing prey in the savannah, a new study finds.

Whereas conventional robots are made of rigid parts vulnerable to bumps, scrapes, twists, and falls, soft robots inspired by starfish, worms, and octopuses can resist many such kinds of damage and squirm past obstacles. Soft robots are also often cheaper and simpler to make, comparatively lightweight, and safer for people to be around.

However, the rubbery materials that make up soft robots often trap heat, exacerbating problems caused by overheating. Moreover, conventional devices used to control heat such as radiators and fans are typically made of rigid materials that are incompatible with soft robotics, says T.J. Wallin, a co-author and research scientist at Facebook Reality Labs.
 
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