F 35 JSF Fighter

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
F-35 Squadron Commander: The most extreme missions are flown in simulator so as not to reveal how tough aircraft Norway now has
Saves on powder in peace time

A significant part of the training is getting the Norwegian F-35 pilots in the eight new simulators in Ørland - a technology that is as well-guarded as the aircraft itself.

But training in a simulator is not just about reducing the risk of loss of life and expensive material. Some of the motivation is to be able to practice the most extreme operations without also risking revealing graded information. It is important to save on powder in peace time.

It emerged in a status report that Colonel Lieutenant Ståle "Steel" Nymoen, commander of 332 Squadron, presented at Rygge Wednesday in connection with the Air Force declaring First Operational Capability (IOC) with its 15 F-35A.

- In the F-16 era, simulator training was rarely something to look forward to, while today the pilots come out of the simulator with a wide smile. We can fly rougher in the simulator than in reality, otherwise we may get hurt showing "someone" what kind of capacity we actually have, the squadron commander said.

The road to the IOC
The eight highly advanced simulators are used on average for two trips per day. An estimated 30-40 percent of the training takes place virtually.


Minister of Defense Frank Bakke-Jensen, Lieutenant Colonel Ståle Nymoen, commander 332 Squadron and Major General Tonje Skinnarland, commander of the Air Force, under the IOC mark on Wednesday. Photo: Eirik Helland Urke

While F-16 pilots can only get basic training in simulator, F-35 pilots can rely on advanced scenarios. In the simulators, the pilots get a lot of training and can test out what will be very difficult to train in reality, such as the fight against many opponents in the air. Here the limits can be pushed free of any errors.

The video at the top shows some glimpses from two years of testing and evaluation that have led to the IOC. For example, mounting a GBU-31 bomb in the abdomen, sharp shooting with Amraam air-to-air missile and finally so-called deployment to Rygge now in October and November. This is referred to as the last exam that had to be passed before Major General Tonje Skinnarland, commander of the Air Force, was able to report the aircraft ready for the Chief of Defense.

This means that the F-35A is ready to be deployed on sharp contingency missions or in international operations. Norway is the eighth nation or arms branch to declare IOC ("initial operational capability").

Anyone who has followed with at least half an eye knows that there have been some issues that have had to be resolved along the way in the F-35 program. Which is neither unusual for such large technology development programs in general, nor fighter jets in particular. For the Air Defense, the last has been a brake screen that is not as reliable as it should have been and needs to be redesigned. Without Nymoen being willing to see the big problem.

- I'm not afraid to use the brake chute. Remember that we have had the F-35 for two years and should have them for another 40. Challenges will certainly emerge in the future as well, but they are being addressed, Nymoen said.


F-35A fighter aircraft landed for the first time at Rygge Air Station on September 17, 2019. The final exam before the IOC was nine days of deployment in October and November. Photo: Onar Digernes Aase / Armed Forces

Better performance, lower price at the right time
Compared to, for example, the NH90 helicopters, the Norwegian F-35 acquisition becomes the success story of the times. Defense Minister Frank Bakke-Jensen, who participated in the IOC marking, recalled that in fact, as early as 2011, the goal was for the Norwegian aircraft to achieve the first operational capability in 2019. That they achieved.

- With the F-35 in place, we have a plane that far exceeds what the F-16 has ever delivered. This is much more than an F-16 replacement, but a weapon system that supplies the entire Armed Forces with a number of new capabilities we have never had before. The fighter jets are delivered on time, with better performance than expected and with a lower unit price than planned, the defense minister said in his speech on the airstrip where the first F-16 aircraft landed on January 15, 1980.

The F-16 aircraft now have two years left in the Norwegian defense. All of them are gathered in 331 squadron in Bodø where they will continue to deliver QRA readiness for NATO ("Quick Reaction Alert") out 2021. From 2022 this job is taken over by F-35 from Evenes.

In terms of unit price, which describes aircraft and engine without additional equipment, it stood at $114 million for the first two aircraft Norway received in the fall of 2015. The six aircraft that Norway received in 2018 cost $ 96.6 million and were realized according to the Ministry of Defense. about one and a half million dollars lower than planned.

The recent agreement between Lockheed Martin and the JPO multinational program office prices F-35A in the upcoming production lot 12 to $82.4 million, down to $79.2 million in lot 13 and $77.9 million in production lot 14. Thus, they have come under $80 million one lot earlier than planned. This is the price of US aircraft for the USAF, while the Norwegian ones cost about one and a half million dollars more, mainly because of the brake chute.


F-35A over Rygge. Photo: Eirik Helland Urke

F-35A returns from deployment

The Norwegian planes' first scheduled deployment now, as they are operational, is to Iceland in March, where they will exercise air control on behalf of NATO.

The US Air Force was the first to deploy the F-35A in combat. Last week, they returned home to Hill Air Base, just north of Salt Lake City, Utah, after six months at the Al-Dhafra base in the United Arab Emirates. According to the USAF, the planes have been used, among other things, for close support and general deterrence in the region.

- We demonstrated to our allies and enemies that the F-35A is ready for any mission it is assigned
, says Colonel Lieutenant Joshua Arki, commander of the 4th Fighter Squadron.
 
Viimeksi muokattu:

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
F-35NO3.png
F-35NO2.pngF-35NO1.png
 

Raveni

Ylipäällikkö
Mikäs tuohon moottorin päälle on tupsahtanut? Ei ole aiemmis kuvissa tuollaista näkynyt? Aika iso jopa tutkaheijastimeksi.
 
Yllättävän smoothin näköinen paketti tuolle jarruvarjolle saatu aikaiseksi. Tuosta kuvakulmasta on vähän huono sanoa, mutta vaikuttaa siltä että se on suunniteltu niin että sivulta katsottuna jää perävakaajan taakse piiloon ja suoraan edestäpäin kuomun. Minkähän verran tuolla on vaikutusta RCS:ään muista suunnista tarkasteltuna.

Tutkaheijastimet ovat nekin tuossa kuvassa näkösällä. Ne ovat nuo neljä pientä pötkylää joista kuvassa näkyy parhaiten tuo siiven ja perävakaajan väliin jäävä.
 
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Reactions: TT

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
ItalianF-35pilotIceland2019coldWeatherGear.jpg

LIGHTNING STRIKES IN ICELAND
Dec 2019 Giovanni Colla

"Italy deployed F-35A Lightning IIs operationally for the first time in October to undertake the NATO air policing mission safeguarding Iceland’s airspace, and Combat Aircraft was granted exclusive access to the detachment at Keflavík.

WITH ITS REMOTE geographical location and total lack of organic air defense capabilities, Iceland relies completely on its NATO allies for air policing. A periodic presence of NATO fighter aircraft at Keflavík air base is viewed as being sufficient to maintain the integrity of its airspace. In contrast with the Baltic Air Policing (BAP) mission, which involves continuous coverage, the Icelandic government has consistently only requested an average of three annual deployments, with each lasting for three to four weeks.

In late September, the Italian Air Force (Aeronautica Militare, AM) spearheaded the third Icelandic fighter detachment of 2019 under its Task Force Air (TFA) 32nd Wing, dubbed Operation ‘Northern Lightning’. As the name alludes, this saw six F-35As from the 13° Gruppo of the 32° Stormo at Amendola heading north to patrol Iceland’s airspace....

...A team from Amendola began to work on specific requirements including scramble operations that focused on the Icelandic scenario. An advance party then flew to Iceland on September 23 to set up a force protection team, a headquarters and the necessary communications equipment. The six jets were then deployed as four aircraft on September 25 and a further pair the following day — flying direct from Italy. The entire move was supported by four KC-767A and eight C-130J missions, while a P-72A from the 41° Stormo provided search and rescue cover....

...Explaining the reasoning behind allocating F-35s to this relatively benign mission, Task Group Lightning commander Maj Giuseppe (full name withheld for security considerations) commented: ‘The added value of the F-35 is its ability to take information — even from a distance of the unidentified aircraft — and pass it in real time to the command and control chain. Therefore the aircraft allows me — even before making the VID [visual identification] — to have the necessary information, after which we can complete the intercept to check all the other data that is requested from us in flight.’...

....The climatic conditions also served as a useful test for the ability to adapt to any temperatures. Maj Giuseppe concluded: ‘The aircraft can move from the extreme heat of Arizona to the cold of this part of the world. The F-35 is ready to go in all weather conditions.’"
Photo: "The pilots ‘stepped’ to the jets fully kitted out and prepared for the cold Icelandic climate."
Source: Combat Aircraft Magazine December 2019 Volume 20 Number 12
 

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
Lockhead Martin will replace U.S. Navy LCD screens with OLED

From eMagin 3Q 2019 Conference Call -

Additionally, we are receiving orders and supplying OLED microdisplays for the F-35 program. On our website, we have posted an article from Naval Aviation News (hyvä linkki) that appeared over the summer. In that article, it was reported that the improved generation-3 helmet, which incorporates our OLED displays, will be fully implemented to the entire F-35 community. I would encourage you to take a look and read it. It is very interesting and highlights how new naval pilots have successfully completed night carrier qualifications using our OLED in the F-35 helmet-mounted display systems.
 

Tetra

Ylipäällikkö
Lahjoittaja
ELSO 2.0
Lockhead Martin will replace U.S. Navy LCD screens with OLED

From eMagin 3Q 2019 Conference Call -

Additionally, we are receiving orders and supplying OLED microdisplays for the F-35 program. On our website, we have posted an article from Naval Aviation News (hyvä linkki) that appeared over the summer. In that article, it was reported that the improved generation-3 helmet, which incorporates our OLED displays, will be fully implemented to the entire F-35 community. I would encourage you to take a look and read it. It is very interesting and highlights how new naval pilots have successfully completed night carrier qualifications using our OLED in the F-35 helmet-mounted display systems.
Esiintyyköhän näissä burn-inia :unsure:
 

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
Projecting power with the F-35 (part 1): How far can it go?

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/proje ... can-it-go/

Projecting power with the F-35 (part 2): going further

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/proje ... g-further/

Projecting power with the F-35 (part 3): operational implications

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/proje ... lications/

Projecting power with the F-35 (part 4): offshore bases

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/proje ... ore-bases/

Projecting power with the F-35 (part 5): Can a B set you free?

https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/proje ... -you-free/
 

TT

Eversti
Eikös se ole aika satavarma että jos F35 meille tulee, niin se on A-versio? Melkein laittaisin tredin otsikkoon sen. Vaikka saahan täällä noista muistakin jutella, ei sillä.
 

yrjö

Ylipäällikkö
A-versio on ainoa mitä meille tarjotaan joten onhan se melkein varmaa
 

John Hilly

Kenraali
PÅuolustustusministeriö aikoo saada ALIS -järjestelmästä uuden version käyttöön laivueisiin sysksyyn 2020 mennessä. Sanovat sen olevan homattava parannus nykyiseen.

 

Protheon_93

Kenraali
Kuulin huhua, että F-35A:ssa pitäisi olla tilaa asentaa se Droque/Hose-tankkausmenetelmä, koska siellä ei ole mitään siinä kohtaa, jossa B/C-versiossa on tuo Drogue/Hose - tankkaussysteemi. Joten voisimme tietysti hankkia joko Airbus A400M:n tai KC-130:n ja pyytää vaan Lämäriltä että laittakaa tämä tankkausjärjestelmä myös mukaan. Tuskin se ainakaan miljoonaa maksaisi. Ja varsinkin, jos loppukokoonpano tehdään Suomessa, niin eihän siinä ole oikeastaan sitten mitään ongelmaa. Pyydetään vaan tuo toisen tankkausjärjestelmän osat myös tarjouksessa ja sillä selvä.
 

magitsu

Ylipäällikkö
uskin se ainakaan miljoonaa maksaisi. Ja varsinkin, jos loppukokoonpano tehdään Suomessa, niin eihän siinä ole oikeastaan sitten mitään ongelmaa. Pyydetään vaan tuo toisen tankkausjärjestelmän osat myös tarjouksessa ja sillä selvä.
Varmasti maksaisi miljoonia, sillä jos jarruvarjo katolle maksoi jo 1,5. Sille pitäisi kaikki testit ajaa läpi Suomen pussista ja niitä on peijoonisti.
Sitä paitsi erilaista rööriä ei tarvita. Tehtäisiin turhaan vähän erilainen versio F-35A:sta kuin kaikki muut.
Kyllä kai me osataan tilata Air Force -mallinen tankkeri harjoittamaan kelpoisuuksia ja pitkiä siirtolentoja varten.

Onko kukaan kuullut mitään viime aikoina Kanadan F-35ista tämän suhten? Silloin aiemminhan he tuskailivat juuri tätä, mutta olennaisena erona heillä on jo vääränlaisia tankkereita.
 
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